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    Dominican University
   
 
  Aug 23, 2017
 
 
    
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Undergraduate Bulletin 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

School of Professional and Continuing Studies


History

Dominican University’s long commitment to continuing and adult education began providing some form of continuing education almost since its inception, including courses in the 1930s that eventually culminated in the creation of the Education for Leisure program, which offered free courses to those affected by the Great Depression. More formally in the 1970s through the 1980s, the University created a Continuing Education Center, later named the Institute for Adult Learning. The institute was renamed in 2007 as the School of Leadership and Continuing Studies and in 2011 as the School of Professional and Continuing Studies. The School offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in flexible and convenient formats for working adults.

Academic Goals and Outcomes

Students in the School of Professional and Continuing Studies will …

  • be life-long competent social learners.
    • Students will be able to articulate an opinion based on a group discussion.
    • Students will be able to evaluate sources of information.
    • Students will be able to synthesize diverse sources of information
  • have a foundational knowledge base.
    • Students will be able to explain core concepts.
    • Students will be able to identify the ideas of key thinkers in the discipline.
    • Students will be able to demonstrate a basic competency in the liberal arts and sciences beyond their chosen field of study.
  • be able to apply their knowledge.
    • Students will be able to identify a practical application of a theoretical concept.
    • Students will be able to articulate an example of how a concept applies in their own lives.
    • Students will be able to create a real-world deliverable derived from course content.
  • be global citizens.
    • Students will be able to discuss the global implications of domestic policies.
    • Students will be able to compare and contrast different cultural practices.
    • Students will be able to articulate ways in which individual actions can have widespread consequences.
  • respect diversity.
    • Students will be able to explain viewpoints that differ from their own.
    • Students will be able to compare and contrast different cultural practices.
    • Students will be able to identify their own inherent biases.
  • have developed appropriate research and information literacy skills.
    • Students will be able to construct a plan for finding information.
    • Students will be able to critically evaluate sources of information.
    • Students will be able to synthesize diverse sources of information
    • Students will be able locate appropriate sources of information, particularly primary sources.
  • be able to communicate effectively.
    • Students will be able to write in a clear and professional manner.
    • Students will be able to adapt their communication style to the appropriate audience.
    • Students will be able to advance an argumentative thesis.
    • Students will be able to demonstrate respect when communicating with others.
  • have and live according to a sense of ethics.
    • Students will be able to identify ethical issues in real-life scenarios.
    • Students will be able to articulate the ethical bases for a particular course of action.
    • Students will be able to compare and contrast the ideas of major ethical thinkers.
  • embrace the Dominican mission.
    • Students will be able to articulate the importance of truth, justice and service.
    • Students will be able to explain how the Dominican mission relates to their own lives.
    • Students will be able to apply what they learn to further peace and justice in their communities.
  • have developed a sense of self-actualization.
    • Students will be able to restate the ideas of others.
    • Students will be able to cite examples of self-actualization in their own lives.
    • Students will be able to demonstrate self-confidence.
    • Students will be able to critique the perspective of others.
    • Students will be able to integrate skills learned outside and inside the classroom
    • Students will be able to devise strategies to overcome challenges.

Undergraduate Admissions

Individuals meeting the requirements for admission to SPCS may begin the process of applying by completing an online application.  The requirements for admission are as follows:  at least 7 years out of high school and 30 semester hours of college credit OR at least 7 years out of high school with significant professional work experience if transferring under 30 semester credits.  If no college transcripts are available, the applicant must provide a high school transcript instead.  The admission decision is reserved for the SPCS admissions committee after review of the entire application and supporting documents.  The application can be accessed at any time at continuingstudies.dom.edu or a paper copy can be obtained from the SPCS Office. It must be completed, signed, and submitted by the student. Transcripts detailing all credits earned at all schools prior to application at Dominican are required as well as a 1-2 page personal essay or statement of purpose in order to complete the application.  Application fees may apply.  Dominican University Admissions Operations processes applications for SPCS.  After an acceptance decision, SPCS provides students with a letter of acceptance for their records. Students can begin classes at the next available semester start date offered 3 times a year. Students may begin as a student-at-large; however, they are not eligible for Financial Aid. Students who are away for three semesters or more must reapply for admission and must also register for a course or readmission will be denied. If an applicant does not meet the age requirement, an age waiver request form may be submitted and a waiver requested of the Assistant Provost.

 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission, applicants whose native language is not English and/or student requiring a visa (F-1) and I-20 form, must demonstrate English language proficiency. This can be done by scoring a minimum of 550 on the paper-based Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL) or a minimum of 213 on the computer-based TOEFL. Additionally, students must show evidence of adequate financial support for two years.

Student-at-Large

Applicants who would like to take an individual course(s) may do so as a student-at-large (non-degree seeking student). The maximum number of semester hours a non-degree seeking student may earn is 30 hours. A student-at-large is not eligible for financial aid.

Conditional Admittance

Students who have been otherwise accepted but do not have all official college transcripts on file will be considered conditionally accepted until all official documents are received by Admissions Operations. Students will be permitted a maximum of three courses or two sessions (one semester) to submit this documentation.

Unofficial Evaluations & Transcripts

SPCS will provide interested individuals with an unofficial evaluation of previous coursework. This evaluation can be completed using official or unofficial college transcripts or other records as available and may be used initially in course selection and planning, however, in order to successfully apply to the program, all official transcripts should be sent directly to Admissions Operations, 7200 West Division St., River Forest, IL  60305, and must arrive sealed in order to be acceptable. These official transcripts will be used by the Office of the Registrar to complete official transcript evaluations.

Veterans

Veterans are encouraged to submit all records of service for evaluation of possible credit.

Credit for Prior Learning

Proficiency Exams

Proficiency exams are available for English and mathematics. Students can receive guidelines regarding the materials covered in the course, as well as information about the exam. Students can arrange to take exams through SPCS or with a local proctor by arrangement. There is no charge for proficiency exams. See your academic advisor for details.

CLEP

College Level Examination Program exams (or DANTES exams if you are in the armed forces) offer students an opportunity to earn credit in a variety of subject areas. A student may not CLEP out of any of the required seminars, nor EN 102, although the English Comp with essay exam will waive English Composition I. Further information is available by logging on to www.collegeboard.com and following links to CLEP. Students interested in CLEP may take CLEP exams until the semester before graduation. No CLEP credit will be granted within the last semester before graduation.

ACE

American Council on Education (ACE) recommendations are used as guidelines to evaluate selected baccalaureate level coursework. Any certificates that were earned through company training workshops and seminars must be submitted and evaluated for credit approval prior to enrolling/matriculating in your first course in the SPCS. After matriculation, certificates will not be accepted.

Portfolio Assessment Prior Learning Credit/Prior Learning Assessment

The prior learning portfolio assessment option is open to individuals currently enrolled as degree-seeking students in SPCS. The amount of credit attempted and earned through prior learning is dependent upon the scope and depth of each student’s applicable prior college-level learning. It is also dependent on the student’s aptitude for writing, independent reflection and study, etc. The amount of credit attempted also depends upon the student’s degree plan and what courses are required for which a prior learning assessment option is available.

Credit given for prior learning will be awarded on a pass/no credit basis. This credit can be considered part of the 30-hour residency requirement. Prior learning credit awarded will not affect the student’s grade point average. Students can use only one option (e.g. CLEP, Portfolio Assessment) to earn credit for a particular course through prior learning. This does not apply to courses for which credit has already been granted. Students must apply for and complete portfolios prior to their last semester before graduation. Portfolios will not be accepted the semester prior to graduation.

NOTE: A maximum of 27 hours may be earned in combination of all alternative credit options.